• The roller shade is still a good option. At its most basic, the material is wound around a wooden dowel and is spring loaded for pulling up and down. Roller shades can be a simple addition behind draperies, adding not only privacy but also another layer of style to your windows.
  • Roman shades are a bit more visually present than basic roller shades. These shades can be constructed from virtually any fabric that would be appropriate for draperies, but they are an alternative to draperies that is lighter and usually less costly.
  • Relaxed roman shades are the epitome of casual chic. The unconstructed style lends a soft, finished look to windows. When this shade is raised, the center of the shade slightly bows down as the fabric stack comes together in gentle folds.
  • The hobbled Roman shade works just like a flat Roman, except that the shade is constructed with soft horizontal pleats across the front at regular intervals.
  • A balloon shade is a type of Roman shade that is made to puff out along the bottom when it is raised. You can mount your shades on a board or gather them on a rod. Either way they bring a wonderful softness and romance to windows.
  • An Austrian shade is created when the fabric falls in a series of puffy festoons created by vertical rows of shirring. When raised, the Austrian shade gathers into full poufs; when lowered, it maintains a ruffled, shirred effect. This shade style works best with sheer or lightweight fabrics.
  • Fabric shades can be adapted fairly easily to fit nonstandard and curved windows, which is just one of the many reasons shades need to be on your short list when you are considering window treatments.